Archive for the ‘exhibitions’ Category

Big Bang Data at Somerset House in London, other exhibitions and interviews, and 5 million + cats!

Wednesday, December 2nd, 2015

I Know Where Your Cat Lives will be featured at the new exhibition, Big Bang Data, opening today at Somerset House in London. This is a traveling exhibition curated by Olga Subirós and José Luis de Vicente.

image001

Emails, selfies, shopping transactions, Google searches, dating profiles: every day we’re producing data in huge quantities. Our online activity, alongside that of businesses and governments, has led to a massive explosion – a ‘Big Bang’ – of data.

This radical shift in the volume, variety and speed of data being produced, combined with new techniques for storage, access, and analysis, is what defines the proliferation of data. It is radically reshaping our world and is set to revolutionise everything we do.

Data today gives us new ways of doing things: from scientific research to business strategy, politics to social interaction, our new data-driven society that has the potential to be more fair, stable, and efficient and yet it also created a tools for unprecedented mass surveillance and commodification. Data access and usage rights, along with the value they comprise, are at the heart of many concerns.

Big Bang Data explores the issues surrounding the datafication of our world through the work of artists, designers, journalists and visionaries. As the data explosion accelerates, we ask if we really understand our relationship with data, and explore the meaning and implications of data for our future.

sustainability

The exhibition, which runs Dec 3, 2015—Feb 28, 2016, includes over 50 works by artists, designers and innovators, comprising also a number of authors I’ve long admired like:
Brendan Dawes, Charles Joseph Minard, David McCandless, Ellie Harrison, Eric Fischer, Erica Scourti, Eva and Franco Mattes, Fight for the Future and Demand Progress, Florence Nightingale, Forensic Architecture, Future Cities Catapult, Heather Dewey-Hagborg, Horst Ademeit, IF, Ingo Günther, Ingrid Burrington and Dan Williams, Interaction Research Studio, Goldsmiths, ITO World, Jaime Serra, James Bridle, John Snow, Jonathan Harris, Jonathan Minard, Julian Oliver, Julie Freeman, Kamel Makhloufi, Kiln, Laura Poitras, Lev Manovich and Moritz Stefaner, Lisa Jevbratt, Lise Autogena and Josh Portway, mySociety, Nesta, Nicholas Felton, Open Knowledge, OpenCorporates, Owen Mundy, Paolo Cirio and Alessandro Ludovico, Philipp Adrian, Rafael Lozano Hemmer, Ryoji Ikeda, Safecast, Stefanie Posavec and Giorgia Lupi, Tekja, TeleGeography, The Guardian, The Long Now Foundation, Thomson and Craighead, Timo Arnall, Umbrellium, William Elford, and Zach Blas

Some press is emerging already and I’ll add more images as the show opens:

Meanwhile time for a…

2015 Update on IKWYCL

Just over a year ago I launched I Know Where Your Cat Lives and it immediately went viral. I’m gracious for all the positive attention the project has received, and even more so for the reach it generated. In addition to a notable influence on research and dialogue around metadata security, the impact for individuals has been significant. Over 25% of owners of cat photos from the original sample have removed or increased privacy on their images and, even more noteworthy, nearly 60% of users have chosen to leave their photos public but have manually removed their location data from the images they shared, underlining the importance of this project to experts in the field, as well as everyone who uses social media.

Screen Shot 2015-12-03 at 1.00.30 AM

Since then I’ve found time to evaluate the project’s impact and begin to work on the conclusion. The site I shared was only a prototype, containing just one million images from the at least 15 million tagged with #cat on social media. Thanks to everyone at FSU’s Research Computing Center, and to support from Dr. Ostrander at the FSU Office of Research, I’ve made great progress in collecting and visualizing the millions of images that users have unknowingly uploaded with geolocation data. With this exhibition at Somerset House I’m uploading another large dataset to bring the total number of cats to just under 5.4 million!

Screen Shot 2014-10-29 at 4.30.31 PM

The final project will include expanding the data set to run in real time, as well as a mobile app called “Like Tinder for Cats,” and a book project which contextualizes and documents the research, the technology I developed, and most importantly, the impact of this ephemeral web-based work on industry, academia, and culture. I’m also thankful for the opportunity to work with my longtime colleague and amazing writer, Shana Berger, on the writing for the project, the first essay of which is currently under review.

Highlights from the last year

The IKWYCL prototype website has already received press in Motherboard/Vice Magazine, The New York Times, Time Magazine, The Atlantic, Wired Magazine, MSNBC, NPR, and many others. It has been featured in several international exhibitions including the Tempo Documentary Festival in Stockholm, Sweden, and numerous others like:

doclabsamples

I Know Where Your Cat Lives was nominated for a 2014 IDFA DocLab Award for Best Digital Storytelling at the International Documentary Film Association (IDFA) Festival. While ultimately the amazing Serial podcast took the prize, I was thrilled to be nominated among many great interactive documentary works including Miranda July’s conceptual app Somebody. Read more about IDFA DocLab in this review on We Make Money Not Art.

I was also excited to take part in the festival, not only as a presenter, but a mystery guest on the evening of my talk. Previously I had shared a selection of my Google searches with a team of experts who led a quiz style analysis of my search history, complete with an artist who did a rendering of what my family looked like according to my searches, and a chef who prepared food for the audience based on what my data revealed.

That same month found me giving a presentation on my work during the L2 Forum at the Morgan Library in New York City.

lisa salon

While in NYC I also spoke at the LISA (Leaders in Software and Art) Salon at Postmasters Gallery

Screen Shot 2015-12-03 at 9.06.29 AM

In May 2015 it was featured among works by Trevor Paglen and Jason Salavon in the exhibition Art In The Age Of… Planetary Computation, at the Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art in Rotterdam curated by Adam Kleinman. This was followed by an exhibit on interactive storytelling and the future of digital media at the Polish National Audiovisual Institute (NInA) in Warsaw curated by Anna Desponds.

Finally, I was very honored to be interviewed this summer for two separate European journalism projects around the cultural impact of technology.

Silvia Font published an extensive discussion which included many of my previous works for El Diario. The interview, Las fotos de tu gato en internet ponen en jaque tu privacidad (in Spanish), was part of a series that included interviews with Laura Poitras and Jacob Appelbaum.

touslesinternets

And, Charles-Henry Groult interviewed me for an ARTE web special about people shaping the culture and politics of the internet. The interview is in English but the interface elements are only in French and German

The dialog with these professionals was really gratifying. I’m so glad to have created something that is so thought-provoking, has proven impact, and yet is extremely fun to use. Thanks to everyone for the support :-)

Owen Mundy on Arte

Story-re-telling exhibition, National Audiovisual Institute (NInA), Warsaw, Poland

Wednesday, October 21st, 2015

Photos from the Story-re-telling exhibition at the National Audiovisual Institute (NInA), Warsaw, Poland (September 25–October 18, 2015) curated by Anna Desponds.

“I know where your cat lives” proclaims artist and programmer Owen Mundy. And indeed – the website created by him can not only recognize pictures of cats from the web, but also precisely pinpoint where they were uploaded.

Cats, which had heretofore led a sheltered life, have recently become Internet mascots. They have entered the public sphere – much in the same way as information about Internet users. This seemingly innocent, funny and simple project in which we watch a map with thousands of photos of cats, moving in a matter of seconds from Bangkok to Rome, is in fact a commentary on the all-knowing web and the often unquestioning satisfaction with which we relinquish our privacy. After all, it’s easy to imagine a similar app for pictures of children instead of cats.

This is not the first one of Mundy’s projects to deal with the topic of the safety of data on the web. He has also created the app Give Me My Data which allows users to reclaim their own information from Facebook and use it for further analyses or visualizations.

Unlike Facebook’s creator Mark Zuckerberg, who claims that privacy is dead, Mundy thinks that it is evolving. Many people didn’t want to show their cats on the webpage – browsing the site you can see which pictures have been removed by users. On the other hand though, many people supposedly reached out to Mundy to ask how they could add their cat to the map.

I know where your cat lives
USA, 2014
Author: Owen Mundy
Team: Owen Mundy, Nicole Kurish, Tim Schwartz, Alissa McShane, Shana Berger
URL: iknowwhereyourcatlives.com

program-festiwal-wersja-beta-2015_top

DSC_9710

festiwalbeta3_51

DSC_0001

festiwalbeta3_49

festiwalbeta3_76

Photos: Malwina Toczek/NInA

Art In The Age Of… Planetary Computation, Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art

Tuesday, May 12th, 2015

I Know Where Your Cat Lives at Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art in Rotterdam.

2015_witte_de_with_01
Opening of the exhibition ‘Art In The Age Of…Planetary Computation’, 21 May 2015. Photo: Aad Hoogendoorn

2015_witte_de_with_02
Opening of the exhibition ‘Art In The Age Of…Planetary Computation’, 21 May 2015. Photo: Aad Hoogendoorn

Art In The Age Of… Planetary Computation
22 May – 16 August 2015
Opening: 21 May 2015, 5pm

With: Aram Bartholl, Rossella Biscotti, Nina Canell, John Gerrard, Femke Herregraven, Antonia Hirsch, David Jablonowski, Navine G. Khan-Dossos, John Menick, Owen Mundy, Trevor Paglen, Lucy Raven, Stephan Tillmans, Julia Weist

How would you draw a picture of the Internet; through the machines and ‘their’ language that broadcast and store ‘our’ messages, or through the affect and power relations that those messages and their movement produce?


Exhibition visitors guide

Art In The Age Of… Planetary Computation investigates how quantification, telecommunications, and our ever-expanding information apparati not only inform contemporary artistic production, but also how contemporary art can hold a mirror up to these processes and formations. The participating artists explore the fissure between literal infrastructure—code, machines, wires, and other like-vocabularies—and the subjective socio-political interactions fostered by using these devices. Guided not only by that which can be seen on the computer screen, and the various other black mirrors we stare into day in and day out, this exhibition also looks to what happens behind these screens. Moving from objects to subjects, we ask, how do these positions impact daily life, or said in another way: what does it mean to be ‘screened’?

Art In The Age Of… Planetary Computation is the second iteration of Art In The Age Of…, a three-part presentation series running throughout 2015, that investigates future vectors of art production in the 21st century.

witte_de_with_logoWitte de With
Center for Contemporary Art
Witte de Withstraat 50
3012 BR Rotterdam
The Netherlands
www.wdw.nl

Exuberant Politics

Monday, March 24th, 2014

PS1_0002

March 6-April 8, 2014
Opening Receptions:
Legion Arts – March 6, 5-7 PM
1103 3rd St. SE, Cedar Rapids

Public Space One – March 7, 6-8 PM
120 N. Dubuque St., Iowa City

see websites for gallery hours
www.legionarts.org
www.publicspaceone.com

Exhibiting Artists – Legion Arts

Brandon Bauer (United States), Mark Cooley (United States), Priti Cox (United States), Liz Ensz (United States), David Fodel (United States), Ben Grosser (United States), Miguel Angel Hernandez (Mexico), Mahdyar Jamshidi (Iran), Wago Kreider (United States), Jane Lawson (United Kingdom), Fred Lonidier (United States), Kim Maher (United States), Timea Oravecz (Hungary), Brian Prugh (United States), Ali Reid (United States), Charles Roderick (United States), Alicja Rogalska (United Kingdom), Fabio Santacroce (Italy), SeedBroadcast (United States), Robert Spahr (United States), Joanna Tam (United States), Lieve Van Stappen (Belgium)

Exhibiting Artists – Public Space One

Esther Baker-Tarpaga and Windega Tarpaga (United States), Pedro Bustamente (Germany), Vivian Charlesworth and Alyson Ogasian (United States), Stephen Chen (Germany), Chris Collins (United States), English Disco Lovers (United Kingdom), Liz Ensz (United States), Jeremy Entwistle (United States), Paul Handley (New Zealand), Josh Hoeks (United States), Faith Holland (United States), Sam Holler (United States), Philip Mantione (United States), Owen Mundy (United States), Jessica Pleyel (United States), Blanca Rego (Spain), Vincent Romaniello (United States), Jennie Schankar (United States), Heath Schultz (United States), Levi Sherman (United States), SeedBroadcast (United States), Greg Thompson (United States), Margi Weir (United States)

Plus posters and reading materials by

Richard Bannister, Bluelab, Andy Cairns, House Magic Bureau, Iraq Veterans Against the War, Kazu Livingstone, Anna McIntyre, Feliz Mundo, Tea Popovic, Melissa Potter, Matt Taylor, John Vincent, Food for Free Thought, Gene Elder, Alou Randon, Andy Singer, and Elizabeth Tonnard.

Supported by the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Perry A. and Helen Judy Bond Fund for Interdisciplinary Interaction, the Studio for Public Digital Arts and Humanities, the School of Art and Art History, the Obermann Center, and the Project on the Rhetoric of Inquiry.

1.5 x 3.5, Orlando Museum of Art

Friday, December 6th, 2013

Joelle and I installed a new work at the Orlando Museum of Art this week…

2x4_oma_2013_30_1024w

1.5 x 3.5 is a single-channel generative animation by Joelle Dietrick and Owen Mundy, currently displayed in the Orlando Museum of Art’s New Work Gallery. The title 1.5 x 3.5 is the actual measurement for a 2 x 4 inch board. Ubiquitous as an article for the construction of buildings, as well as a formal, minimal, primitive shape, the 2 x 4 here is transformed through its incorporation into a virtual space. The simulation of the generic form becomes an index for any building material, physical or digital, and its manipulation, a metaphor for the fragmentation of digital communication.

2x4_oma_2013_35_1024w

2x4_oma_2013_36_1024w

As the main character in their animation, the 2 x 4 is virtually constructed then multiplied and subtly manipulated to form an evolving cluster floating above a photograph of a contemporary construction site. From a housing development just northeast of Orlando, nestled between the Florida Turnpike and Old Country Road 50, this backdrop also calls to mind another space described by the minimalist sculptor Tony Smith. Smith describes a drive down an unfinished highway as a sublime experience. The highway’s liminal state-imagined, artificial, and full of potential-liberated Smith’s assumptions about art.

1.5 x 3.5 grows out of their recent series of installations, prints, and public artworks called Packet Switching. This body of work uses custom software to visualize architecture as fragments affected by economic and communications systems.

2x4_screen_07_crop_1000w

 

No-one Ever Cried At A Website (Speed Show) Friday, November 22

Tuesday, November 19th, 2013

No-one Ever Cried At A Website (Speed Show)

November 22, 5:00–6:30 pm EST, Computer training room, Facility for Arts Research, 3216 Sessions Road, Tallahassee FL

With FSU students: Monique Boileau, Alexis Cooper, Jonathan Davito, Danielle English, Justin Greenstein, Antoinette Janus, Scotty Johnson, Melissa Lidsky, Michelle Medrano, Denise Morrow, Lena Weissbrot, Meghan “Red” Yancey. Curated by: Owen Mundy

Students from the Fall 2013 Network Art and Typography classes in the Department of Art at Florida State are staging an exhibition titled No-one Ever Cried At A Website (Speed Show) on November 22 5:00–6:30 pm EST at the computer training room in the Facility for Arts Research, Tallahassee FL.

The exhibition title is modified from an article called, “No-one Ever Cried At A Website,” written by artist/coder Matt Pearson. The document examines how emotion is often forgotten when analyzing technologically-sophisticated works of art such as those which exist on the internet. It reminds readers that painting was once a technology, and asks how beauty, empathy, and interaction can all be triggers for emotional response regardless of the medium for delivery. The prompt for the works in this show, created mostly collaboratively, over the course of 10 days, and specifically for this exhibition, is to address how emotion can be used to engage online audiences to look, listen, and be moved by internet-based art.

Speed Show exhibition, popularized by artist, Aram Barthol, are arranged as following: “Hit an Internet-cafe (or computer classroom), rent all computers they have and run a show on them for one night. All art works of the participating artists need to be on-line and are shown in a typical browser with standard plug-ins.”

Poster: Print resolution and E-mail resolution

CYBER IN SECURITIES, Pepco Edison Place Gallery, Washington, DC

Friday, August 9th, 2013

CyberInSecurities_grid

clockwise l to r: Ricarada McDonald and Donna Szoke, and all watched over by machines of loving grace; Birgit Bachler, Walter Langelaar, Owen Mundy, and Tim Schwartz, Commodify.us; Lexie Mountain, Ball Hard; Whitefeather, Parent Folder

CYBER IN SECURITIES
Dates: August 30 – September 27, 2013
Location: Pepco Edison Place Gallery, 702 8th Street, NW, Washington, DC

Curated by: Lisa Moren, Professor, Department of Visual Art, University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Participating Artists: Birgit Bachler, Walter Langelaar, Owen Mundy, and Tim Schwartz; Channel TWo (CH2): Adam Trowbridge and Jessica Westbrook, with Jesus Duran; Heather Dewey-Hagborg; Hasan Elahi; The Force of Freedom with Dave Young; Taylor Hokanson; Ricarda McDonald and Donna Szoke; Lexie Mountain; Preemptive Media; David Rokeby; Julia Kim Smith; and WhiteFeather

Opening Reception: Friday, August 30, 2013, 6-8pm
Exhibition Hours: Tuesday – Friday, 12pm-4pm

Experimental Media Video Screening Series
Juried by Jason Eppink, Associate Curator of Digital Media, Museum of the Moving Image, New York

Experimental Media Video Series Night One: Thursday, September 12, 2013, 6:30pm
Location: The Phillips Collection, 1600 21st Street, NW, Washington, DC

Experimental Media Video Series Night Two: Monday, September 24, 2013, 6:30pm
Location: The Corcoran Gallery of Art and College of Art + Design, 500 17th Street, NW, Washington, DC

Experimental Media Symposium: Saturday, September 21, 2013
Location: Pepco Edison Place Gallery, 702 8th Street, NW, Washington, DC

Experimental Media 2013 will explore security, privacy, and surveillance in the digital age, through a gallery exhibition, video screenings series, and panel discussion.

Terms & Conditions of Use (documentation)

Tuesday, May 21st, 2013

Terms & Conditions of Use, curated by Sarah Higgins and part of the larger Less Like an Object More Like The Weather Graduate Thesis Exhibition at the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College/Hessel Museum, closes this Sunday. Here are some images and a video from two of the three commissioned works for the exhibition.

bard_terms_title_1000w

terms_ticker_05_800h

Commodify.us PeopleTicker, computer, thermal printer, paper, 2013

terms_ticker_09_1000w

Commodify.us PeopleTicker, computer, thermal printer, paper, 2013

terms_network_05_1000w

A Network Has No Center (“standard” mode), projector, custom software, ink jet on mylar, 2013

terms_network_07_1000w

A Network Has No Center (“standard” mode), projector, custom software, ink jet on mylar, 2013

terms_network_29_1000w

A Network Has No Center (“cracked-out” mode), projector, custom software, ink jet on mylar, 2013

terms_network_22_1000w

A Network Has No Center (“cracked-out” mode), projector, custom software, ink jet on mylar, 2013

terms_network_28_1000w

A Network Has No Center (“cracked-out” mode), projector, custom software, ink jet on mylar, 2013

[vimeo https://vimeo.com/66589749 w=600]

Packet Switcher @ Herron School of Art and Design (documentation)

Sunday, April 28th, 2013

Some images from the exhibition…

herron_darkly_29_desert_1000w

Through A Glass Darkly: Epilogue (7:30), Single-channel video, 2011 (left) and Through A Glass Darkly (12:08), Single-channel video, 2008 (right)

herron_darkly_29_apocalpse_1000w

Through A Glass Darkly: Epilogue (7:30), Single-channel video, 2011 (left) and Through A Glass Darkly (12:08), Single-channel video, 2008 (right)

herron_commodifyticker_03_1000w

Commodify.us Ticker (with Commodify, Inc.), Live data stream, 2012-13

herron_unable_10_1000w

I Am Unable To Fulfill Your Wish, Line-plotter prints w/archival ink

herron_unable_05_1000w

I Am Unable To Fulfill Your Wish, Line-plotter prints w/archival ink

herron_unable_17_1000w

I Am Unable To Fulfill Your Wish, Line-plotter prints w/archival ink

herron_consequence_03_1000w

The Consequence of Scale, Projectors and custom software, 2009

herron_selfprinttest_05_irvine_1000w

Self.print.test (with Ryan Boatright), Ink jet prints and custom software, 2012-13

herron_selfprinttest_20_sideview_1000w

Self.print.test (with Ryan Boatright), Ink jet prints and custom software, 2012-13

herron_selfprinttest_19_1000w

Self.print.test (with Ryan Boatright), Ink jet prints and custom software, 2012-13

herron_selfprinttest_17_1000w

Self.print.test (with Ryan Boatright), Ink jet prints and custom software, 2012-13

herron_drone_01_1000w

The Drone War Did Not Take Place (with The Periscope Project), Google Earth API and custom software, 2012

A Network Has No Center in-progress

Sunday, March 31st, 2013

In-progress shots from A Network Has No Center (2013) commissioned by Sarah Higgins for the exhibition “Terms & Conditions of Use”, at the Center for Curatorial Studies Bard / Hessel Museum.

network_center_01

network_center_02

network_center_17

network_center_12

network_center_06