Posts Tagged ‘Florida’

1.5 x 3.5, Orlando Museum of Art

Friday, December 6th, 2013

Joelle and I installed a new work at the Orlando Museum of Art this week…

2x4_oma_2013_30_1024w

1.5 x 3.5 is a single-channel generative animation by Joelle Dietrick and Owen Mundy, currently displayed in the Orlando Museum of Art’s New Work Gallery. The title 1.5 x 3.5 is the actual measurement for a 2 x 4 inch board. Ubiquitous as an article for the construction of buildings, as well as a formal, minimal, primitive shape, the 2 x 4 here is transformed through its incorporation into a virtual space. The simulation of the generic form becomes an index for any building material, physical or digital, and its manipulation, a metaphor for the fragmentation of digital communication.

2x4_oma_2013_35_1024w

2x4_oma_2013_36_1024w

As the main character in their animation, the 2 x 4 is virtually constructed then multiplied and subtly manipulated to form an evolving cluster floating above a photograph of a contemporary construction site. From a housing development just northeast of Orlando, nestled between the Florida Turnpike and Old Country Road 50, this backdrop also calls to mind another space described by the minimalist sculptor Tony Smith. Smith describes a drive down an unfinished highway as a sublime experience. The highway’s liminal state-imagined, artificial, and full of potential-liberated Smith’s assumptions about art.

1.5 x 3.5 grows out of their recent series of installations, prints, and public artworks called Packet Switching. This body of work uses custom software to visualize architecture as fragments affected by economic and communications systems.

2x4_screen_07_crop_1000w

 

Packet Switching exhibition, Center for Emerging Media @ UCF

Thursday, January 10th, 2013

Catching up on some documentation from recent shows. Below are images from the Packet Switching exhibition at the Center for Emerging Media, University of Central Florida, October 2012.

2012_ucf_00_flatscreen_cyan

2012_ucf_00_flatscreen_grey

2012_ucf_00_flatscreen_magenta

2012_ucf_00_flatscreen_green

2012_ucf_25

Packet Switching project: ColladaFragmenter software, Kassel, Germany and University of Florida Public Commission

Tuesday, August 21st, 2012

Joelle Dietrick and I embarked on a new body of work this summer called “Packet Switching.” Inspired by her Sherwin Series images and wall paintings, and my work deconstructing and re-visualizing source code and other data, we’ve created two new software projects, as well as a series of limited edition prints, large photo installations, wall-sized paintings, and animations.

The full statement explains our process and intent clearly:

Packet Switching is an ongoing body of work by Joelle Dietrick and Owen Mundy that visualizes architecture as fragments affected by economic and communications systems.

The title of the series references how contemporary communications systems break digital files into smaller manageable blocks of data called packets. Each packet is then sent through a network, taking the quickest route possible, and reassembled once they reach their destination. One JPG image, for example, might be broken into several packets, each of which may travel a different path through the net, even through different cities, before being recompiled into a copy of the original file.

To reference this common process used in networked systems, we wrote custom software that deconstructs a 3D model’s source code and produces unique fragments. We further remixed these fragments using an original application created in Processing. The resulting images become limited edition prints, large photo installations, wall-sized paintings, and animations.

Our process underscores how incidental fragmentation and automation can streamline markets, but also make them vulnerable to systems failure. The use of architecture specifically points to recent real estate market volatility and considers how communication technology-enabled pursuits of profit margins alters our most basic needs.

The first software, that “deconstructs a 3D model’s source code and produces unique fragments,” is open source and available on Github. Essentially, the PHP software, parses a 3D COLLADA file and exports a set number of geometries, that can then be further broken down and used in an artwork or design.

The second software, which we will release soon, remixes these fragments using Processing. The video below shows an example of the whole process.

[vimeo 45473740 w=600&h=338]

Wall painting at “Temporary Home” in Kassel, Germany

While artists-in-residence at Temporary Home, in Kassel, Germany, which coincided with Documenta13, Joelle Dietrick and I completed a wall-sized temporary painting based on the architecture from the Bauhaus School at Dessau and 2012 American color forecasts.

Commission at Weimer Hall at the University of Florida

Joelle and I have also received a commission to complete Packet Switching (Weimer Hall) at the University of Florida College of Journalism and Communications this fall. This will be inkjet on adhesive polyester on a large wall (approx. 177.5 ft. x 20.2 ft.). More details soon.

Give Me My Data! FSU Digital Scholars group

Monday, November 28th, 2011

I am speaking about Give Me My Data at Florida State University’s Digital Scholars group, which is coordinated by Paul Fyfe, Assistant Professor of English, History of Text Technologies hott.fsu.edu

Give Me My Data!
Thursday, December 1, 1:00-2:00 pm
Williams Building 013 (bottom floor), aka the English Common Room
*please note different location*

Please join us for a presentation by Owen Mundy: artist, software designer, and scholar of surveillance cultures from the Stasi to contemporary social networking platforms. Professor Mundy will quickly tour us through his recent research and related project “Give Me My Data,” an application “that helps users export their data out of Facebook for reuse in visualizations, archives, or any possible method of digital storytelling” (http://givememydata.com/). Join us for a stimulating presentation and discussion to follow!

UFF-FSU.ORG

Monday, August 29th, 2011

I recently completed a redesign of United Faculty of Florida – Florida State University (UFF-FSU) union website at uff-fsu.org with colleague, Phil Steinberg. This site runs on WordPress CMS with an altered Twenty Eleven theme. Here are some screenshots:

Space Relations: Joelle Dietrick, Owen Mundy, and Chad Erpelding

Tuesday, January 12th, 2010

space_relations1

Space Relations
Joelle Dietrick, Owen Mundy, and Chad Erpelding
621 Gallery
February 5 – 26, 2010
OPENING: First Friday, February 5, 2010, 6-9p

621 Gallery is pleased to present Space Relations, an exhibition of new work by Joelle Dietrick, Owen Mundy, and Chad Erpelding, on view from February 5 through 26, 2010. An opening reception will be held on Friday, February 5th, from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m.

Space Relations presents an exhibition exploring new ways to think about space. The exhibition playfully recognizes how our experiences warp our understanding of place, especially during tough economic times when often power positions are reordered and people are displaced.

FSU Art Review System Live

Wednesday, November 11th, 2009

The FSU Art Review System is live.

More images online here.

20091111_art_review_home2

20091111_art_review_edit_files

University of Florida Artist Talk, October 15, 2009

Sunday, October 4th, 2009

Thanks to Jack Stenner and Sean Miller for hosting my upcoming artist talk at the University of Florida in Gainesville.

University of Florida Artist Talk
Gainesville, FL
October 15, 2009
7:00 PM

Activate: MK Foltz, Steven Gagnon, Owen Mundy

Saturday, May 23rd, 2009

image003

image004

Activate: MK Foltz, Steven Gagnon, Owen Mundy
June 6-July 24, 2009

Opening reception: June 6, 4-7 PM
Pabst Visitor Center & Gallery, Atlantic Center for the Arts
1414 Art Center Avenue, New Smyrna Beach

Gallery hours: Tuesday through Friday, 10 AM to 4 PM
Information: 386.427.6975
www.atlanticcenterforthearts.org

Free/Public Invited

Aspect: The Chronicle of New Media Art _VOL.12 Fall 2008

Friday, December 12th, 2008

aspect12_cover

Aspect: The Chronicle of New Media Art
Volume 12: Vital presents nine artists exploring that which is essential, grave, indispensable, and/or critical to existence. Mirroring preconceived notions of reality, these works re-imagine new deities, investigate animal nature and human desire, contemplate the body vs. the psyche, meditate on the circular nature of our existence, and in one case force us to witness the final minutes of life. We confront our own profound mortality, experience fear and displacement within a technological landscape, and consider the sustaining reciprocal relationship of artist and gallery.

  • 9-11/9-11 by Mel Chin w/ commentary by Ute Meta Bauer
  • Liberation of the Paranoid World; Gargoyling; Pressing the Vessel by Goatsilk w/ commentary by Ricardo de Mambro Santos
  • Primate Cinema by Rachel Mayeri w/ commentary by Meredith Tromble
  • Sequence of Good Intentions by Park McArthur w/ commentary by Michael O’Malley
  • Bathyscape by Andrew Mowbray w/ commentary by Matthew Nash
  • Anemophilous Formula for Computer Art by Joelle Dietrick and Owen Mundy w/ commentary by Eduardo Navas
  • Freund Hein by Elisabeth Smolarz w/ commentary by Angelique Campens
  • Polar Bear God by Deke Weaver w/ commentary by Una Chaudhuri
  • excerpts from Untitled (Red); Untitled (Blue); Tell Me; Ned Talking by Suara Welitoff w/ commentary by Andrew Witkin

anemophilous

Anemophilous Formula for Computer Art by Joelle Dietrick and Owen Mundy
custom software
2007

Inspired by Jim Campbell’s Formula for Computer Art and Tallahassee’s annual sea of tree pollen, Mundy and Dietrick created a data-based animation referencing new forms of cross-pollination and re-use. Made to be meditative and aesthetically pleasing, the format parodies computer art that simply crunches numbers to create useless forms. The diligently recorded data of the National Allergy Board guides the animation down a predictable path and stands in stark contrast to the chaos of everyday life. The project calls into question our obsession with mapping nature, as if grasping its sublimity would be essential to finding lifelong satisfaction.