Posts Tagged ‘infovis’

Give Me My Data _new images

Saturday, May 1st, 2010

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Give Me My Data (fb_friends_20100128_white)

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Give Me My Data (fb_mutualfriends_20091114_black)

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Give Me My Data (fb_mutualfriends_20100430_dark3)

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Give Me My Data (fb_profile_xml_20100430)

Give Me My Data updates

Wednesday, April 28th, 2010

Give Me My Data is a Facebook application that helps you reclaim and reuse your facebook data. It is currently in-development but starting to receive an amazing amount of traffic from Facebook users. Apparently the developers at Facebook made a change to the interface this week leaving many users unable to find or display specific information they had added to their pages. Give Me My Data helps users circumvent the problems they are having with the interface by giving them another way to access their data.

Due to the amount of questions I have received about the application I decided to launch a new website to share information about it here: givememydata.com

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Facebook application interface

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Visitors from this week (via statcounter)

The application profile page
Use the application

HZ Net Gallery #13

Monday, December 21st, 2009

hz logoKeyword Intervention has been included in the recent HZ Net Gallery update. Also included were: Alysse Stepanian, Rudi Punzo, Aaron Oldenburg, Aaron M. Higgens, Anders Bojen & Kristoffer Ørum.

Visualizations of sitemap and content of owenmundy.com via manyeyes

Sunday, August 9th, 2009

Experimenting with various methods of visualization available at manyeyes

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Wordle cloud

Mapping the content from owenmundy.com

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2009

Every page on my website and blog. Created using a PHP spider and MySQL. Click image for PDF file.


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Sitemap of owenmundy.com with PHP-based spider and Graphvis

Wednesday, July 8th, 2009

Screenshots of a sitemap of my website generated using Graphvis and a .dot file created with a PHP spider.

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Aspect: The Chronicle of New Media Art _VOL.12 Fall 2008

Friday, December 12th, 2008

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Aspect: The Chronicle of New Media Art
Volume 12: Vital presents nine artists exploring that which is essential, grave, indispensable, and/or critical to existence. Mirroring preconceived notions of reality, these works re-imagine new deities, investigate animal nature and human desire, contemplate the body vs. the psyche, meditate on the circular nature of our existence, and in one case force us to witness the final minutes of life. We confront our own profound mortality, experience fear and displacement within a technological landscape, and consider the sustaining reciprocal relationship of artist and gallery.

  • 9-11/9-11 by Mel Chin w/ commentary by Ute Meta Bauer
  • Liberation of the Paranoid World; Gargoyling; Pressing the Vessel by Goatsilk w/ commentary by Ricardo de Mambro Santos
  • Primate Cinema by Rachel Mayeri w/ commentary by Meredith Tromble
  • Sequence of Good Intentions by Park McArthur w/ commentary by Michael O’Malley
  • Bathyscape by Andrew Mowbray w/ commentary by Matthew Nash
  • Anemophilous Formula for Computer Art by Joelle Dietrick and Owen Mundy w/ commentary by Eduardo Navas
  • Freund Hein by Elisabeth Smolarz w/ commentary by Angelique Campens
  • Polar Bear God by Deke Weaver w/ commentary by Una Chaudhuri
  • excerpts from Untitled (Red); Untitled (Blue); Tell Me; Ned Talking by Suara Welitoff w/ commentary by Andrew Witkin

anemophilous

Anemophilous Formula for Computer Art by Joelle Dietrick and Owen Mundy
custom software
2007

Inspired by Jim Campbell’s Formula for Computer Art and Tallahassee’s annual sea of tree pollen, Mundy and Dietrick created a data-based animation referencing new forms of cross-pollination and re-use. Made to be meditative and aesthetically pleasing, the format parodies computer art that simply crunches numbers to create useless forms. The diligently recorded data of the National Allergy Board guides the animation down a predictable path and stands in stark contrast to the chaos of everyday life. The project calls into question our obsession with mapping nature, as if grasping its sublimity would be essential to finding lifelong satisfaction.